Dreambird Shawl (1)

DreambirdShawl1

This summer I began working on the Dreambird Shawl. If you’re going to tackle this pattern, I would strongly suggest you work off the row-by-row instructions. Up to the now-infamous Row 28, the long-form instructions are reasonably easy to follow, but after that it all goes pear-shaped as the designer tries to be extremely helpful, and ends up confusing most of those who have stumbled over this row’s instructions. Switch to the row-by-row instructions.

I made a small change on rows 15 and 16 too, to ensure the background yarn wrapped right around the tip of the feather:
Row 15: k 44
Row 16: k2 p 42

Other than that, it’s a really interesting and beautiful pattern. I’ve only got a few more feathers to work (or I’ll run out of yarn!) and then will knit a couple of rows of garter along the neck edge (not included in the pattern) to tidy it up. Seems like that’s what quite a few others have done.

BobbinLace-TorchonGroundBookmark1

Torchon Bobbin Lace

I seem to have become a tad enamoured of bobbin lace. This weekend I hosted Creative Fibre’s first Bobbin Lace for Beginners class – strictly in a support capacity, although I doubt I’ll get away with that for long. Especially as we had 3 keen new students! In fact, everyone was so keen, we decided to start a new club – the Auckland Lacemakers Club. This isn’t in competition with Bridge Lacemakers, but rather augments those people who have an interest in preserving heritage crafts like this.

Once these skills are allowed to die out, that’s it. However, it seems that’s a loooong way off happening. Bobbins are doing a brisk trade, books are still being published, and there are lacemakers all over the world, working away at this exacting craft.

I say exacting, because after this weekend’s efforts, I’m clearly going to have to pace myself and take more stretchy breaks – my neck and shoulders kinda seized up from bending over the board for hours and hours on end. But look what I made! Looky-look!

(Torchon lace ground bookmark; No.8 mercerized cottons)

Tackling Bobbin Lace

Due to a bad case of tennis elbow (or perhaps more appropriately – knitter’s elbow!), I’m having to take a break from knitting and crocheting. Even spinning is curtailed to short bursts. Fortunately, I went along to the recently held Creative Fibre Auckland Area Retreat and seem to have picked up a possible new craft – bobbin lace.

BobbinLace1

At first glance it seems impossibly fiddly (it is) and the domain of the mad and OCD-afflicted (it is). Yet somehow I find the exacting nature of the work quite relaxing. Plus, it doesn’t exacerbate the elbow injury. The bobbins themselves are also ridiculously cute, and I like cute. Especially cute with bling!

BobbinLace2

On the last day of the Retreat, I was admiring someone else tackling a very fiddly bit of lace, when somehow I found myself beginning work on a practice piece… and agreeing to go along to the lacemaker’s guild. Not sure how this has happened, not sure how long it will last, but I guess we’ll see how mad I am… or not, as the case may be…

crafting like a womble

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